Having Enough

January 10, 2012 at 10:00 am Leave a comment

How much is too much? How much is enough? These questions are relative.

What I have learned in more than 20 years working in the nonprofit sector – there are always people who are less fortunate than me, less fortunate than our donors.

The key to our success as fundraisers is sharing stories of the people we serve with those who can provide the financial support to make a difference. When our focus is donor-centric, we can share the right stories, at the right time. I have always said my job as a fundraiser is to offer education (stories) and opportunity – it is up to the donor to make the decision that is right for them. When we connect the donor to a beneficiary’s story, how we change lives and save lives and invite them to join us in the work, they get it.

We can’t make people give us money. Someone who is not generous – does not become generous overnight. Those who think they never have enough, can’t understand how giving is better than keeping. We will never convince them otherwise.

Focusing our time and effort on generous people is more than RFM and donor behavior – generosity is a state of mind. (Yes, of course, donors need to have capacity.) Understanding that giving is better than receiving. Knowing the more you give, the more you will receive. Working with these donors is so much fun! They get it. They want to do good and make a difference through philanthropy.

We can identify the people who care about our work.
We can determine how and when they like to give.
We can engage them in our work.
We can ask them, invite them to support our work.

Generous people understand having enough means giving to others.

Entry filed under: Fundraising, Nonprofit fundraising. Tags: , , , .

Monthly Giving – Five Ideas Acoustic Fundraisers – Five Tips to Great Field Research

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Categories

Barbara’s Twitter Feed


Mid-life Minimalist

Mid-life Minimalist: Journey towards a more meaningful life

Annual Fund Lab

Sparking Ideas; Generating Conversation

HBR.org

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

SSIR Articles

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

Mary Lee Walker - Nonprofit Gladiator

Applying sound business principles as nonprofit best practices

National Committee For Responsive Philanthropy

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

Lilly Family School of Philanthropy

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

The Chronicle of Philanthropy

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

The Fundraising Authority

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

Seth's Blog

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

Kivi's Nonprofit Communications Blog

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

Wild Woman Fundraising

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

Future Fundraising Now

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

The Agitator

Philanthropic Counsel - Coaching - Hands on Fundraising - Board Engagement

Beyond Melbourne

Food Travel Markets Artists

%d bloggers like this: